Civil forfeiture subject loses motion for complaint against Tucson police

 Ron Johnson, far right, smoking with friends and marijuana advocates, Robert Clark and Mark Brown, at the 420 Social Club on Fourth Ave./Maria Inés Taracena
Ron Johnson, far right, smoking with friends and marijuana advocates, Robert Clark and Mark Brown, at the 420 Social Club on Fourth Ave./Maria Inés Taracena

By Maria Ines Taracena | Tucson Weekly

Ron Johnson, the founder of the 420 Social Club on Fourth Avenue, finally got his day in front of a judge this week to decide if a complaint he filed, bringing much-needed local attention to the controversial law enforcement practice of civil forfeiture, had legal standing.

After his one-hour testimony Monday afternoon, a Pima County Superior Court judge ultimately denied Johnson’s motion, even though the judge recognized that he was a victim, and that the belongings Tucson Police Department agents confiscated from his home should be returned, Johnson says. Problem with that is, the jewelry and computer that were taken from him were destroyed, he says. And the thousands of dollars…well, by now, they have been absorbed into a law enforcement agency.

Continued:

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