Are micro-apartments innovative solutions for cities or future slums?

A resident of the Nakagin Capsule Tower, Masato Abe, sits in his room in Tokyo on September 9, 2014. Around half of the tower's 140 capsules, designed by Japanese architect Kisho Kurokawa in 1972, are currently in use as offices, art studios and second homes. Twenty of the tiny spaces are full-time homes./YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/GETTY
A resident of the Nakagin Capsule Tower, Masato Abe, sits in his room in Tokyo on September 9, 2014. Around half of the tower’s 140 capsules, designed by Japanese architect Kisho Kurokawa in 1972, are currently in use as offices, art studios and second homes. Twenty of the tiny spaces are full-time homes./YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/GETTY

By Johnathan Glancey | Newsweek

Soon enough, short of some last-minute appeal on behalf of protesters, Brill Place Tower will be shooting up from a site in Somers Town, a slightly neglected district just north of St. Pancras station in central London. The 25-story building is actually a pencil-thin pair of what dRMM, its inventive young architects, call micro-towers, built on a footprint of just 3,767 square feet. It was granted planning permission this summer, as part of a £1 billion ($1.22 billion) regeneration plan backed by Sadiq Khan, London’s populist new mayor.

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