[SUNDAY FEATURE] New uranium mines: no simple answers

The view of the underground operations at the now-closed Pinenut Mine on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon. The underground structure includes drifts (tunnels) and openings where ore has been removed. The ceilings are reinforced with rock bolts and other systems to ensure safety./Energy Fuels Resources

By Emery Cowan | Arizona Daily Sun

town on the edge of the Navajo Nation that unknowingly drank uranium-tainted water for at least 12 years. Navajo babies showing increasing uranium concentrations during their first year of life.

Children swimming in natural pools near Cameron they later learned had been filled with water from abandoned uranium mines.

The stories about the impacts of Cold War-era uranium mining on the Navajo Nation became highly personal during a forum hosted at the Museum of Northern Arizona Wednesday night.

Four decades later, the subject has come to the fore again as a grandfathered uranium mine moves forward with operations south of Tusayan and a new president stokes fears about the reopening of 1 million acres of the Grand Canyon watershed outside the national park to new mining.

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