Adaptability in the face of a pandemic

Telecommuting policies can help many companies keep functioning at a time of extreme uncertainty

Remote-working arrangements reduce the odds that the coronavirus will sweep through cubicles, break rooms, factory floors or other company facilities.
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By Russ Wiles | The Arizona Republic

More laptops are powering up at the kitchen table, and more people are dialing in to conference calls in their living room. Working remote — already common at many companies — has helped employers maintain some sense of routine during the coronavirus outbreak.

Telecommuting policies can help many companies keep functioning at a time of extreme uncertainty in the economy, when travel plans, conferences, business lunches and other once-routine functions are canceled.

Remote-working arrangements reduce the odds that the coronavirus will sweep through cubicles, break rooms, factory floors or other company facilities.

“We need to keep businesses moving forward,” said Kathleen Duffy, CEO of the Duffy Group, a recruiting and human resources company in north Phoenix. Working remotely, she said, is one way to do that.

Many employers learned a lesson in adaptability in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, when airlines were grounded and the economy slowed to a halt. 

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