Power Authority worries bill would threaten Hoover Dam allotment

The level of Lake Mead behind Hoover Dam, as shown in this July 2014 photo, has fallen to record low levels. A continued decline would prompt the U.S. Department of the Interior to declare a shortage that would trigger a first stage of cuts in Arizona’s deliveries of Colorado River water through the Central Arizona Project.
The level of Lake Mead behind Hoover Dam, as shown in this July 2014 photo, has fallen to record low levels. A continued decline would prompt the U.S. Department of the Interior to declare a shortage that would trigger a first stage of cuts in Arizona’s deliveries of Colorado River water through the Central Arizona Project.

By Rachel Leingang | Arizona Capitol Times

A strike-everything amendment targets a little-known state agency that allocates billions of dollars worth of energy from Hoover Dam.

Though few may know of the agency, the Arizona Power Authority’s impact is huge. It’s responsible for allocating low-cost renewable hydroelectric energy from Hoover Dam, which serves about 8 million people in Arizona, Nevada and California.

The Hoover power services cities, towns, agricultural needs, water pumps and electrical districts.

The striker would make several changes to the way the agency does business ahead of a major allocation of Hoover Dam power, which the bill’s supporters say is necessary to address allegations of unfairness.

But the APA says some changes could threaten the state’s allotment from Hoover Dam and could affect bond ratings. APA Vice Chairman Dalton Cole said he is concerned the bill could jeopardize the amount of power Arizona is entitled to from Hoover Dam.

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